Wilderness Spinal Considerations - A Podcast

Welcome to the UNM Austere and Mountain Medicine Blog! We are excited to bring our greater audience up-to-date knowledge pertaining to the field of mountain rescue, wilderness medicine, and all things austere. This blog is intended for wilderness medicine providers and mountain rescue professionals as well as plain-ol mountain lovers who want to gain knowledge about emerging standards in the management of emergencies in the backcountry. We hope to keep our readers (and listeners) current on hot topics in wilderness medicine, backcountry travel, and emergency preparedness. 

Our first Blog post addresses the commonly discussed and often heated topic of spinal precautions in the wilderness. To backboard or not to backboard, has been a question that has seen significant interest in the past decade from the world of EMS (Emergency Medical Services) and emergency departments across the globe. The discussion is further complicated when we encounter a potentially spine injured patient in hazardous terrain or complicated weather, and the implications of applying and maintaining "spinal immobilization" are much greater than in the ED, or even the streets of EMS.

To address this topic, we present our first of many to come podcasts! Listen in to Dr. Darryl Macias, Dr. Aaron Reilly, Dr. Jenna White and Jason Williams discuss where the literature is leading us in the management of possible spine injuries in the backcountry. 

Hope you enjoy it!!!!! 

Resources:
Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment.
Robert Quinn, Jason Williams, Brad Bennett, Gregory Stiller, Arthur Islas, Seth McCord, Wilderness Medical Society: Wilderness Environ Med. 2013 September; 24(3): 241–252

The Long Backboard vs the Vacuum Mattress. McDonald N, Webster M, Orkin A, VanderBurgh, Johnson DE
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014 Feb;29(1):110.

Comparison of a SAM splint-molded cervical collar with a Philadelphia cervical collar.
McGrath T, Murphy C. Wilderness Environ Med. 2009 Summer;20(2):166-8.